Finally Turning The Screws on Cuba

President Trump is about to implement the Title III provision of the Helms-Burton Act of 1996, that will affect companies that do business with Cuba. To crank up the pressure on the regime, the administration has also decided to limit remittances and travel to Cuba.

Realizing the fundamental role Cuba pays in supporting leftist movements and regimes in Latin America, such as Venezuela and Nicaragua, the Trump administration has finally decided to turn the screws on Cuba.

For decades the Cuban regime has exported a toxic socialist ideology throughout Latin America. In Venezuela Cuban intelligence officers and military personnel continue to prop up the repressive regime, frustrating the efforts of the people to oust the illegitimate president, Nicolas Maduro.

It’s about time the U.S. realized that if you don’t deal with the Cuban threat to the region, Venezuela and other leftist regimes such as Nicaragua will continue to solidify their grip on power and defy the will of the people.

“It’s about time the U.S. realized that if you don’t deal with the Cuban threat to the region, Venezuela and other leftist regimes such as Nicaragua will continue to solidify their grip on power and defy the will of the people…”

By implementing the Title III provision of the Helms-Burton Act (1996), the Trump administration is decisively telling nations—Canada and the EU in particular—that they continue to support the Cuban dictatorship at their own risk.

Nations of the world, you will profit from the pain of the Cuban people no more. We will go after you to the full extent of the law.


The EU has said it will challenge the U.S. on this, and litigation by U.S. individuals might take years to be adjudicated, if ever. We will have to wait and see what effect this will have on Cuba. But it is the right thing to do.

But there is another move Trump is making that is spooking the Cuban government even more: the limits on remittances and travel to Cuba that were announced by Bolton in his visit to Miami.

Remittances from the exile community and travel to the island have been the other major source of income for the regime. Money and goods sent by relatives in Miami, and regular visits to see family, have netted Cuba billions of dollars; and these are about to be severely curtailed.

I understand that people want to help their relatives in Cuba. But one of the unfortunate and unintended consequences of sending money and goods to Cuba is that it benefits the regime enormously. Without the millions, the exile community sends to Cuba the government would be on the verge of collapse.

The Cuban regime knows it’s in real trouble now, and Raul Castro came out of retirement to warn the country it is about to enter a very difficult period.
Many Cuban-Americans, including myself, welcome these new moves by the administration. Yes, they will cause some pain to those people who depend on generous remittances. But look at what they stand to gain if they work: freedom from tyranny.

I believe the people of Cuba will agree with us when it comes to freedom, no price is too high to pay.

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