My Interview With Juan Guaido of Venezuela

A few days ago, I interviewed Juan Guaido from Caracas, Venezuela.
Guido, as you know by now, is the interim President of Venezuela; recognized as such by over 50 nations including the U.S. It aired on a local Spanish television channel in Miami and through my social media.

Guido, as you know by now, is the interim president of Venezuela, and is recognized as such by over 50 nations including the U.S. The interview aired on a local Spanish television channel.

I interweaved into the interview with Guaido parts of my previous interview with Nicolas Maduro, the illegitimate leader of Venezuela. I asked Guaido the same questions I asked Maduro in order to contrast their answers.

I am amazed by his bravery and courage and the fact he still smiles—for me it’s a sign of encouragement to every American and a reminder that millions of Venezuelans are ready to fight for the system we sometimes take for granted.

The contrast between the two leaders could not have been more obvious. Maduro was always on the defensive and, despite the evidence shown in the interview, in complete denial about the tragic circumstances through which the people of Venezuela are living. Why? The reason is simple: Maduro embraces a failed economic system he calls “21st Century Socialism.”

It’s the same old socialism of Cuba, but with a pretty name in front.

Over and over, Maduro remained oblivious to the atrocities perpetrated on the people by his paramilitary gangs known as “collectivos”; and when told about the people scavenging through the garbage dumps looking for scraps of food, he robotically reverted to the “accomplishments” of his socialism.


In contrast, Guaido was calm, looking straight at the camera, and defiantly letting Maduro and his henchmen know he was not afraid of them. In a memorable exchange, Guaido told me that he refused to live in fear and stay home because he did not want his daughter ever to see him intimidated by the Maduro forces. “I want my daughter to feel free in her own country, as it should be, so I have to act as a free man.”

Guaido lamented that he cannot do interviews like mine in Venezuela’s news outlets. The opposition has no access to local or national television and radio stations.

By cutting off means of communication inside Venezuela, the regime aims to prevent coordination between different parts of the country when Guaido calls for one of many massive protests against the government.

In spite of these obstacles and constant vulgar display of power by Maduro’s gang of thugs, the protest goes on, with thousands turning out, and people somehow hearing and heeding the call to gather. How many times will Guaido call for marches and peaceful exercises of civil disobedience? I got the impression that for Guaido the idea of giving up and calling for an end to the protests is not in his vocabulary.

Like Joshua in the Bible, he will march on Jericho for as long as it takes for the walls of oppression to crumble. It was very clear to me that for Guaido, there is no retreat and no surrender.

In my last question, I asked him if would invoke (Article 187 of) the Constitution to authorize military intervention on the part of the U.S. or the international community?

He limited himself to saying that he and the other leaders of the democracy movement in the national assembly will consider all options.

He thanked me for having interviewed Nicolas Maduro because I made transparent the moral and political bankruptcy of Maduro and his regime; and then, smiling—as he did throughout the interview—he thanked me and bid me goodbye.

I am amazed by his bravery and courage and the fact he still smiles—for me it’s a sign of encouragement to every American and a reminder that millions of Venezuelans are ready to fight for the system we sometimes take for granted.

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